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Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Treatment

Do you suffer from PMS? Cramps, breast tenderness, headaches, backaches, bloating, angry outbursts, mild depression or skin problems… If you feel rotten for the five or so days before your period starts and the first four days or so after it’s started, the chances are you’re suffering from PMS. Double-check with your doctor that nothing else is amiss.


How to tell if you have it?

Here’s a quick run-down of the symptoms: cramps, breast tenderness, headaches, backaches, bloating, angry outbursts, mild depression and, wait for it, yes, spots.

In other words if you feel rotten for the five or so days before your period starts and the first four days or so after; if dropping the eggs or a bad-hair day makes you burst into tears; chances are you have PMS.

However, do always double-check with your doctor that nothing else is amiss.

Top 5 ways to deal with PMS

Here are a few survival tips well-worth thinking about:

Eat better

  • Try to eat six small meals a day instead of three large ones. By eating little and more often your blood sugar will level out and you should feel better
  • Cut down on fat, sugar and salt
  • Reduce or avoid caffeine and alcohol
  • Eat complex carbohydrates such as foods with whole grains, or beans, brown rice, or lentils.  Calcium-rich foods are good too

Exercise

Get some aerobic exercise – regularly. It’ll give you a lift and may well help you get a good night’s sleep. Light stretching could also help with period pains and cramps.

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Rest

Make sure you grab a full eight hours sleep every night. Regular sleeping habits – even on weekends – can help you feel a lot less moody and tired.

Also, if you can, try to avoid situations that can cause stress, as this may trigger symptoms. Enjoy some ‘me-time’ wherever possible, listen to your favourite music, go for a walk, have a relaxing bath. Or why not try meditation or yoga?

Experiment with supplements

If your healthcare provider suggests a few supplements: calcium, magnesium supplements or even vitamin E – give them a go. They can really help.  But remember, what works for a friend may not work for you. Experiment till you find what suits you.

Get help

If you still feel you can’t cope, don’t be afraid to join a self-help or support group. You are not alone.

Though, if none of these remedies help, it’s time to go to your doctor to ask about PMS treatments.

Good luck!

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